Heraldic Sleeves for Lankin’s Knighting

In February, Mistress Lindoret of Bryn Myrthin showed me images of the heraldic tabard she was making for THL Lankin Ealdwulf for his upcoming knighting at Rowany Festival 2019.

As part of the plan he devised, he wanted to have the devices of his parents Lindoret and Sir Torg Hawkhurst on his sleeves. Lindoret asked me to make said sleeves for him and I was happy to oblige.

The tabard was made inspired by crusader style. Whilst looking for historical inspiration, I noted that depictions of these crusader tabards tended to be sleeveless.

Knights 3

Detail of a miniature of Philip Augustus arriving in Palestine. Royal 16 G VI f. 350v, 14th century. Catalogue of Illuminated Manuscripts (last accessed March 2019).

As such, I sidestepped anachronistically to look at heraldic tabards for knights in other pre-17th century times and places.

The earliest images of heraldic sleeves on knights that I could find in my limited searching were from the 15th century.

Harley 4205 f.31v (det)

Knights jousting from BL Harley 4205, f. 31v, c1450, published by Europeana Collections (last accessed March 2019).

Harley 4205 f.44v

Knight with standard from BL Harley 4205, f. 44v, c1450, Thomas Holme’s Book of Arms. Europeana Collections (last accessed March 2019).

These heraldic sleeves tended to be oval at the top and flatter at the bottom in shape; like an upside-down shield. They also appear to hang to the bend of the elbow. I modeled Lankin’s sleeves on these.

I created the heraldic images using Lindoret and Torg‘s heraldry from Lochac’s Roll of Arms and the Pennsic Traceable Art Project.

I made them from cotton drill to ensure that they would be sturdy for combat. After cutting and sewing the background fabrics, I attached them to a piece of white cotton drill as interlining to ensure the sleeves are sturdy (and to stabilise the applique and couching). I used double-sided iron-on transfer to applique the heraldic charges. I stab stitched the edges of each appliqued piece, and then couched silver cord around each motif, and around the internal details. I also couched silver along the heraldic divides. The shoulders were finished with a black cotton drill lining and black cotton bias binding around the edge.

These will have ties attached to the top so that they can be tied to, and removed from, Lankin’s tabard.

They’re difficult to take nice photos of (metallic couching is tricky to capture with the lighting), but I’ll get more photos of them in use at Festival.

sleeves 1

The completed sleeves – Lindoret’s arms on the left and Torg’s on the right, by Ceara Shionnach 2019.

sleeves 2

Close up of the silver couching on the unicorn motif of Lindoret’s arms. By Ceara Shionnach, 2019.

sleeves 3

Close up of the silver couching on the eagle on Torg’s arms. By Ceara Shionnach, 2019.

sleeves 4

The shoulder with Lindoret’s arms. By Ceara Shionnach, 2019.

sleeves 5

The shoulder with Torg’s arms. By Ceara Shionnach, 2019.

References

Catalogue of Illuminated Manuscripts (last accessed March 2019). Detail of a miniature of Philip Augustus arriving in Palestine. Royal 16 G VI f. 350v, 14th century.

Europeana Collections (last accessed March 2019). Knights jousting from BL Harley 4205, f. 31v, c1450.

Europeana Collections (last accessed March 2019). Knight with standard from BL Harley 4205, f. 44v, c1450, Thomas Holme’s Book of Arms.

 

 

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